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The Business of Fashion on Instagram

The Business of Fashion on Instagram

An essential daily resource for fashion creatives, executives and entrepreneurs all over the world.

Virgil [Abloh] is such an intensely polarising person,  says our editor-at-large Tim Blanks in this week s #BoFPodcast episode in which he summarises the #menswear season that just ended. While some applauded Abloh s collection, others pointed out similarities to the work of other designers.  Absolutely everything is fluid,  says Blanks.  Once you start saying  who did this first?  you re opening a hornet s nest, because you can go on and on.  However, he argues that it is definitely important to give credit, especially when star designers take something  lock stock and barrel  from their lesser known contemporaries.

Of course, there was more to the season. According to Blanks, stand-out moments included Raf Simons  first show for his namesake label following his departure from Calvin Klein, and the latest Loewe collection from Jonathan Anderson, who was  talking about escape and romantic, young nomads . Not to forget an inspiring memorial at the Grand Palais, where the industry paid tribute to the late #KarlLagerfeld, in a variety show that included video testimonies, acting cameos and musical performances.  You re sitting there and thinking: who else would the fashion industry do this for?  said Blanks. Tune in to hear his full conversation with BoF s Imran Amed on businessoffashion.com [Link in bio]
Virgil [Abloh] is such an intensely polarising person, says our editor-at-large Tim Blanks in this week s #BoFPodcast episode in which he summarises
There are no normal ways to talk about Galliano; his work provokes an emotional experience that exalts the senses,  says André Leon Talley in the preface of a new book called  John Galliano for Dior . Documented by photographer Robert Fairer, the book captures the designer s extraordinary creations during his tenure at the French fashion house in previously unseen behind-the-scenes moments. Swipe for a few excerpts from the book.  : Robert Fairer #JohnGalliano #fashionphotography #dior
There are no normal ways to talk about Galliano; his work provokes an emotional experience that exalts the senses, says André Leon Talley in the pr
What s the  Plan B  for  Made in China ? The manufacturing world is facing the unenviable task of trying to keep up with modern politics. Brands whose bottom line relies on continuous, reliable, uninterrupted trade await the outcome of Donald Trump s meeting with Xi Jinping in Osaka today   and his threat to impose tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese-made goods.

The threat has been almost as effective as actual tariffs: brands including Crocs, Ralph Lauren, Uniqlo, Levi s, Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger have already moved their manufacturing base out of #China. Yes, politics is not the only factor   rising Chinese labour costs and local manufacturers  increasing reluctance to produce low-cost goods prompted the sourcing caravan to move on long before the current #tradewar. But, there is no doubt that #Trump has hastened their departure. Where fleeing brands land is dependent on a number of factors: product category, material, labour costs and skill, workers  rights, access to ports, manufacturing equipment, tariff structures, distance to end market and   in particular   production capacity.

Indeed, the US is highly dependent on the Chinese market for clothing and footwear and the impact of President Trump s protectionist stance is making a challenging environment even more so for fashion brands. Whatever the coming months bring in terms of #tradepolicy, diversification is the way to implement some degree of contingency planning. While there are many offshore options for fashion players to consider, a few sourcing hot spots are emerging as firm favourites. To read the full article, join #BoFProfessional and get members-only exclusive content, unlimited access to articles, all online courses, the iPhone app and special print issues. [Link in bio]  : @shutterstock
What s the Plan B for Made in China ? The manufacturing world is facing the unenviable task of trying to keep up with modern politics. Brands whose
Does the world need $4,500 sunglasses? The explosion of the global luxury market over the last decade has rewarded its top players handsomely   the margins on a $1,500 T-shirt or a $170 paperclip can be quite generous. But the growth in the market raises a question about what it means for an item to be luxury: Is it exclusive? Is it truly luxe? Or is it just expensive?

Dita, an eyewear brand more than two decades old, is testing the limits of the category. In July, the company will start selling eyewear that costs anywhere from $1,800 to $4,500. That s well beyond the brand s typical $400 to $700 price tag, and several times more than the most expensive pair of shades offered by Chanel or Celine. The company only expects to sell a few hundred pairs, on which it will  barely break even,  says Creative Director Dustin Edward Arnold. Rather, the eyewear s out-of-this-world price is meant as a proof of concept for a new category of ultra-expensive products and services the brand has dubbed  Epiluxury.  The company isn t the first to hit upon the idea of charging obscene prices to the global 0.1 percent.

Bugatti makes one-of-a-kind $12.5 million supercars; Richard Mille timepieces run as much as $750,000 and offer bragging rights to its owners (most recently, a colloquial flex courtesy of one Rafael Nadal); and then there is Hermès  Birkin bag, costing anywhere between $10,000 and nearly $400,000 for a version in exotic leather, and shoppers are subject to a lengthy waiting list. These brands are all competing for a lucrative sliver of the $1.3 trillion luxury market. Read the full story at businessoffashion.com [Link in bio]  : @ditaeyewear  : Alexandra Mondalek
Does the world need $4,500 sunglasses? The explosion of the global luxury market over the last decade has rewarded its top players handsomely the ma
Over the course of her career, #VeraWang has grown a single bridal boutique into a fashion and lifestyle empire. After graduating college, Wang was hired by #Vogue as an assistant but quickly worked her way up the ladder, becoming one of the magazine s youngest ever fashion editors. Wang told BoF:  I got to work with Irving Penn and Richard Avedon   it is kind of insane really when I think back on it. It gives you an education that is parallel to none. There is nothing that isn t available to you if you believe in it and want it and defend it to your boss. You had the best hairstylists, the best makeup artists, the best new photographers, the best established photographers.  But, after being turned down for the editor-in-chief position, Wang left Vogue and, in 1987, joined Ralph Lauren.

Two years later, while planning her #wedding, Wang had an epiphany.  I was a late bride and that experience of metamorphosis, going from being a fashion nun to being a bride, was kind of extreme for me,  she says.  There wasn t anything, either a retail situation or a couture [designer] that really satisfies the needs of modern women, in my opinion. I was using common sense and thinking,  Well, everybody doesn t want to wear the 4-inch cap-sleeve where you can t lift your arms and a bodice of sequined lace with a big pouf skirt and stuff around your hair dangling down.  I just thought there was another vision.  As a result, Wang opened her own bridal boutique in 1990 on Madison Avenue.  I think I brought fashion to [the bridal industry]. I was fearless because I really didn t know any better.  Regardless of her modesty, the results of Wang s personal story speak for themselves. On her birthday, learn how the designer parlayed a successful bridal business into a fully-fledged lifestyle brand. [Link in bio]  : @inezandvinoodh
Over the course of her career, #VeraWang has grown a single bridal boutique into a fashion and lifestyle empire. After graduating college, Wang was hi
Prada has suffered through some tough years after a series of strategic missteps, but has lately taken measures to get back on track, explains BoF contributor Luca Solca. The Italian #luxury group recently announced its plans to further reduce wholesale exposure. This follows on a decision to stop promotions within its full-price retail stores. Both are commendable steps to achieve better price discipline, a key requirement for maintaining long-term brand equity.

The brand has also announced that it will stop selling fur. This comes on the back of moves to mend past merchandising mistakes: bringing back nylon and entry price handbags; increasing the number of leather goods styles and re-focusing on newness; and moving sneakers centerstage and relaunching the sporty #LineaRossa.

Yet #Prada remains a step (or two) behind its peers. And a look back at the last five years shows the brand has too often been behind the curve. Prada was opening stores when competitors were already trimming their retail networks. It was the last of the Mohicans to recognise digital as a strategic priority. And now, Prada is sponsoring the America s Cup sailing competition, after Louis Vuitton concluded that its own sponsorship of the event was no longer effective. So, where does Prada go from here? For Solca  organisational development is key    but will that be enough? [Link in bio]  : @gettyimages  : Luca Solca
Prada has suffered through some tough years after a series of strategic missteps, but has lately taken measures to get back on track, explains BoF con
Japan s menswear expertise isn t a new phenomenon. It all began in the  80s, when Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto launched their menswear collections in Paris.  After that, the genre of Japanese fashion became respected, cutting edge and avant garde,  says W. David Marx, the Tokyo-based author of Ametora: How Japan Saved American Style. Issey Miyake and Comme des Garçons protégé Junya Watanabe have also gone on from this first wave of globally renowned masters to launch commercially successful menswear collections.

But it doesn t stop there. Last week, Yoshio Kubo was just one of the many Japanese #menswear designers that made a splash in the Paris Fashion Week Men s, showing his collection through virtual reality headsets. Other names included genre-defying Bed J.W. Ford, whose creative director Shinpei Yamagishi unveiled an Adidas collaboration at #PittiUomo this month, and Auralee, the minimalist cult favourite and winner of #Tokyo city government s second fashion prize.

Elsewhere, Japan s menswear labels are also making themselves heard. This past May, Arashi Yanagawa s label John Lawrence Sullivan brought its punk take on tailored suiting to London Fashion Week Men s, while Landlord s Ryohei Kawanishi works out of New York. Online and in stores, menswear destinations Mr Porter, Dover Street Market and Nepenthes are jam-packed with artisanal gems, from tie-dyed hoodies from up-and-comer Needles to off-beat denim separates by Kapital.

For those in the know, Japan s menswear brands have long been the ones to watch. Indeed, their rise has been anything but an overnight affair. The collective effect of their trailblazing collections from decades past are still rippling through the global menswear scene today, and show no signs of waning. [Link in bio] #pfw
Japan s menswear expertise isn t a new phenomenon. It all began in the 80s, when Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto launched their menswear collections
Finding creative uses for #deadstock   a catchall for fabric and clothing that was never purchased by a consumer   has long been a rite of passage for new #designers. A factory s leftovers or a retailer s boxes of unsold jeans tend to be cheaper than sourcing new materials. And limited quantities are perfect for garments destined to appear in a single runway show or a handful of stores.

But a growing number of designers are turning deadstock, vintage and other found fabrics into big business. Thrifty fashion-school students are discovering their ability to scour flea markets and warehouses for discarded textiles can be scaled into global brands. They're increasingly joined by some of the fashion industry's biggest players, including luxury brands riding the nostalgia trend and mass retailers looking to burnish their sustainability credentials with "upcycled" materials. #Reformation, which started outsourcing deadstock from Los Angeles-area stores and factories, has built a $100 million-plus brand, while online fast-fashion giant Asos incorporates vintage and used materials into its "Reclaimed Vintage" line.

Sourcing deadstock can be a creatively stimulating and #sustainable alternative to buying new fabrics, but it's not easy. While using unwanted fabrics saves money at the outset, costs can accumulate later in the process. But finding usable amounts of quality deadstock can be a struggle for growing brands, making it difficult to manage inventories and meet orders from retailers. Read the full story at businessoffashion.com [Link in bio]  : @shutterstock
Finding creative uses for #deadstock a catchall for fabric and clothing that was never purchased by a consumer has long been a rite of passage for
Marchesa s Karen Craig has left the company she co-founded with #GeorginaChapman. "While I have made the difficult decision to part ways with #Marchesa, I have tremendous pride in the company, the team, and the many successes achieved,  she says in a statement.  I am excited to now begin exploring additional creative opportunities and to push my potential as a designer in new directions." Craig did not immediately respond to BoF requests for comment.

Craig and Chapman launched the eveningwear label in 2004 and became a mainstay on the #redcarpet. Since allegations of sexual assault against Chapman s then-husband Harvey Weistein came to light in October 2018, the label has faced difficulties as the Daily Beast uncovered ties between the brand and Weinstein, red carpet appearances shrunk and it cancelled its #NewYorkFashionWeek show. [Link in bio]  : @gettyimages
Marchesa s Karen Craig has left the company she co-founded with #GeorginaChapman. "While I have made the difficult decision to part ways with #Marches
EXCLUSIVE | Condé Nast has sold W Magazine and editor-in-chief Stefano Tonchi is exiting the title. The large-format magazine, known for its avant-garde fashion shoots and Hollywood portfolios, will join the arts and design magazine Surface in the newly formed Future Media Group, which announced the acquisition on Monday.

Future Media s Chief Executive and Chairman Marc Lotenberg named W s Style Director Sara Moonves as editor-in-chief, reporting to him. The magazine will continue to publish eight issues a year while expanding its digital content and diversifying its revenue through memberships, events and television projects, Lotenberg said in an exclusive interview with BoF. [Link in bio]  : Cate Blanchett for W Magazine, photograph by Jackie Nickerson.
EXCLUSIVE | Condé Nast has sold W Magazine and editor-in-chief Stefano Tonchi is exiting the title. The large-format magazine, known for its avant-ga
Bill Cunningham loved fashion but he loved style even more. A true cultural anthropologist, he knew that fashion didn t come from #designer catwalks or from the pages of magazines, but was instead born from #culture. And to him, the best place to find culture was on the street, so that s where he went to work every day.

Cunningham worked the streets as a war #photographer would the battlefield, plowing people down as he raced to get the shot he wanted, whether snapping a 70-year-old crossing the street in an extreme look, a Goth kid hobbling in six-inch platform sneakers outside a club, women wearing extraordinary hats coming out of a Harlem church on Sunday, or waspy blondes in Lily Pulitzer at a benefit in Newport. In 2018, the photographer left behind an enormous archive valued at $1 million. He also, his family discovered with some surprise upon his death in 2016, left a written memoir, which was published later in the year. Today, BoF remembers Bill Cunningham, who passed away three years ago. [Link in bio] #billcunningham #streetstyle
Bill Cunningham loved fashion but he loved style even more. A true cultural anthropologist, he knew that fashion didn t come from #designer catwalks o
Set in the middle of a #lavender field, Simon Porte #Jacquemus presented his latest collection tonight, celebrating the house s 10 year anniversary in #Provence, South of France. Swipe through for a preview of the collection, then let us know in the comments below what you thought about the show.
Set in the middle of a #lavender field, Simon Porte #Jacquemus presented his latest collection tonight, celebrating the house s 10 year anniversary in

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