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The Business of Fashion on Instagram

The Business of Fashion on Instagram

An essential daily resource for fashion creatives, executives and entrepreneurs all over the world.

How does Hearst makes it work? Troy Young, the president of the global #magazine division, is tasked with finding a substitute for print advertising revenue, which has declined relentlessly over the last decade. Young is accustomed to seeing value in magazines beyond the printed page. As the former head of Hearst Magazines #digitalmedia team, he pushed the company to figure out how to make content and money online faster than many of its peers. Now he is trying to future-proof the whole division, one part of the Hearst family s $11.4 billion media and information services business empire. Cosmopolitan, Esquire and Women s Health are among the titles under his watch.  The modern incarnation of a magazine company is hard to communicate. Clearly we are going through change, but it s a golden age because it s an age of reinvention,  says Young.

He is working on the same fundamental problems facing another family-owned magazine business, its chief rival #CondéNast, which also recently installed a new leader with a focus on technology, former Pandora CEO Roger Lynch. The two biggest #print publishers in #fashionmedia are both looking for the magic formula that will replace print advertising, which declined from $20.74 billion to $8.97 billion since 2008, according to eMarketer. Both publishers are developing new revenue streams, whether it s online paywalls, conferences and events, membership programmes, e-commerce or   most lucrative so far   original video content. But, Young isn t looking for quick wins. Rather, he s putting the pieces in place that he hopes will pay off down the line, assuming his vision for the future of the media business comes to pass. [Link in bio]
How does Hearst makes it work? Troy Young, the president of the global #magazine division, is tasked with finding a substitute for print advertising r
Many direct-to-consumer companies have had a good run over the last few years, with start-ups Allbirds and Everlane generating tens of millions of dollars in sales through their own stores and website. But as the pool of fashion brands fighting for eyeballs on Instagram and Facebook becomes more and more crowded, the cost of acquiring customers is spiralling out of control. Many brands are reaching the conclusion that it s worth accepting slimmer margins with a wholesaler rather than going it alone online.

When former Zalando executive Luisa Krogmann decided to start her own upscale shoe brand, Aeyde, the resolve to sell exclusively through its own website, rather than department stores or boutiques, seemed like a no-brainer. After some initial success following the brand s launch, Aeyde struggled to find an affordable way to grow brand recognition and reach new customers outside its home base in Berlin. But, when a chance collaboration with an upscale boutique in Hamburg sold better than expected, Krogmann says she realised wholesale was the answer to her problems. Today, Aeyde generates 40 percent of its sales from department stores like Galeries Lafayette in Paris and Lane Crawford in Hong Kong, as well as boutiques like Assembly in Los Angeles and New York.

Deciding to go wholesale is one thing, knowing which stores to work with and how aggressively to pursue this strategy is another. Swipe across to discover our top tips and read the full story at businessoffashion.com [Link in bio]  : @thisisaeyde
Many direct-to-consumer companies have had a good run over the last few years, with start-ups Allbirds and Everlane generating tens of millions of dol
For beauty journalists just starting out in the industry, becoming an editor at a high-profile magazine or website is a covetable career move.  But for aspiring editors of colour, it s a role that can come with strings attached,  argues style and beauty journalist Jamé Jackson, in a new op-ed today.  When we get those coveted jobs at major publications, they are often quickly revealed to be two roles packed into one: the usual job of sourcing stories and writing up what s new in the world of beauty, and an unspoken job of representing our race on mastheads that are still overwhelmingly white,  she says.

Jackson argues that black editors frequently find themselves in the role of  gatekeeping,  ensuring their white peers don t misuse or gloss over culturally sensitive terms and topics. And they are considered the staff experts on black beauty products, regardless of whether it s their primary area of interest. That role has only grown more complicated as the #beauty industry has taken steps toward improving its record on inclusivity in the face of growing consumer interest. More brands are putting a diverse range of models in their advertising campaigns, and rolling out products meant for customers with darker skin, from Rihanna s LVMH-backed Fenty Beauty to black-owned beauty brands such as Juvia s Place, Beauty Bakerie and Mented Cosmetics.

But beauty publications still often struggle to talk about #inclusivity in an authentic way, which is why, Jackson says, the task often falls to a handful of black staffers.  But the work of showing up for one s culture while still excelling in a mainstream, white-dominated environment, though rewarding, can also be draining for editors of colour. And that s on top of the wider everyday struggles of being black in fashion,  she says. So, what s the solution? Read the full op-ed on businessoffashion.com. [Link in bio]  : @gettyimages   : @theblondemisfit
For beauty journalists just starting out in the industry, becoming an editor at a high-profile magazine or website is a covetable career move. But fo
This week s #MondayMotivation comes from designer Brandon Maxwell, who launched his eponymous label in 2015. The designer grew up in Longview, Texas and studied photography at St. Edward s University in Austin. He entered the fashion industry as a stylist, interning for Deborah Afshani and going on to work with Edward Enninful. In 2010, he began working with Nicola Formichetti, who was Lady Gaga s stylist and fashion director at the time. Two years later, Maxwell took over the role as Lady Gaga s fashion director and has created a number of iconic looks for the singer, which most recently included a series of outfit changes at the 2019 #MetGala.

Today, Maxwell s ready-to-wear label is designed and produced in New York City, and counts several other celebrities and notable public figures as loyal customers: Michelle Obama, Meghan Markle, Oprah and Blake Lively frequently sport Maxwell s signature powersuits and structural tailoring. The designer has a slew of awards to his name, including being named Womenswear Designer of the Year Award by the CFDA in 2019. Earlier this year, Maxwell also served as a judge on Bravo s Project Runway.

Feeling inspired by this story? Find your dream job in fashion and discover the latest opportunities at the world's leading brands on businessoffashion.com/careers #qotd #quoteoftheday  : @gettyimages
This week s #MondayMotivation comes from designer Brandon Maxwell, who launched his eponymous label in 2015. The designer grew up in Longview, Texas a
This week s #MondayMotivation comes from designer Brandon Maxwell, who launched his eponymous label in 2015. The designer grew up in Longview, Texas and studied photography at St. Edward s University in Austin. He entered the fashion industry as a stylist, interning for Deborah Afshani and going on to work with Edward Enninful. In 2010, he began working with Nicola Formichetti, who was #LadyGaga s stylist and fashion director at the time. Two years later, Maxwell took over the role as Lady Gaga s fashion director and has created a number of iconic looks for the singer, which most recently included a series of outfit changes at the 2019 #MetGala.  
 
Today, Maxwell s ready-to-wear label is designed and produced in #NewYork City, and counts several other celebrities and notable public figures as loyal customers: Michelle Obama, Meghan Markle, Oprah and Blake Lively frequently sport Maxwell s signature powersuits and structural tailoring. The designer has a slew of awards to his name, including being named Womenswear Designer of the Year Award by the CFDA in 2019. Earlier this year, Maxwell also served as a judge on Bravo s #ProjectRunway.  
 
Feeling inspired by this story? Find your dream job in fashion and discover the latest opportunities at the world's leading brands on businessoffashion.com/careers #qotd #quoteoftheday  : @gettyimages
This week s #MondayMotivation comes from designer Brandon Maxwell, who launched his eponymous label in 2015. The designer grew up in Longview, Texas a
With a career spanning seven decades, #PierreCardin has become known for his avant-garde style and futuristic designs. Born in San Biagio di Callalta in Italy, Cardin moved to Vichy, France to train as a tailor. After serving the Red Cross during World War II, the designer moved to Paris and worked for the likes of Maison Paquin and Elsa Schiaparelli before joining Christian Dior s house in 1947.

Three years later, Cardin founded his own namesake fashion house, focusing first on costume design and then haute couture. Among his inventions are the bubble dress and the collarless men s suit style, popularised by the Beatles, but he is mostly credited with being one of the pioneers of the #SpaceAge look, alongside Andre Courreges and Paco Rabanne. In addition to his label, which the designer has attempted to previously sell, Cardin has multiple interests and owns a restaurant business and a portfolio of property.

The new retrospective, Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion, at The #BrooklynMuseum, celebrates the designer s work in fashion and beyond, showcasing over 170 objects that date from the 1950 s to present day. Interested in visiting? Tag a friend that you would take below and swipe to discover more of the exhibition.  : Jonathan Dorado, @brooklynmuseum
With a career spanning seven decades, #PierreCardin has become known for his avant-garde style and futuristic designs. Born in San Biagio di Callalta
From #fastfashion to #luxury, big brands want consumers to know they care about the environment. In the last week alone, Inditex SA   owner of Zara, the world s biggest fast fashion brand   launched a suite of new sustainability targets, including a commitment to only use recycled polyester and ensure all its cotton, linen and viscose are  produced more sustainably before 2025. Meanwhile, luxury conglomerate LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton has made an effort to bolster its climate credentials by taking on eco-conscious designer Stella McCartney as an advisor alongside a minority stake in her brand. 
 
Underpinning these moves, and a flurry of similar commitments and investments over the last year that also take into account the industry's treatment of workers, is a rising tide of consumer awareness and regulatory scrutiny on the fashion industry s environmental impact. The challenge for the fashion world is finding a way to operate sustainably and profitably in the long-term. Fundamentally more sustainable fashion, means less fashion. 
 
Nonetheless, brands are increasingly eager to champion their sustainability credentials in a bid to entice younger consumers who claim to care deeply about how and where their clothes were made   42 percent of millennials say they want to know what goes into products and how they are made before they buy, according to The Business of Fashion and McKinsey & Company s annual State of Fashion report. 
 
In the near-term, brands see big potential in conscious consumption, with a growing number of wholesalers carving out spaces in-store and online dedicated to more sustainable products. But longer-term, the trend raises a central tension for many brands: in an era of growing consciousness and concern about the strain mass consumption is placing on the planet and its resources, can brands be #sustainable and continue to grow at the same time? [Link in bio]  : @zara
From #fastfashion to #luxury, big brands want consumers to know they care about the environment. In the last week alone, Inditex SA owner of Zara, t
Ever chatted to a brand via text message? Several fashion companies like Tamara Mellon, Burberry and Reformation are jumping on board  conversational commerce,  a term coined in #SiliconValley that speaks to companies that interact with shoppers on chat platforms like text messaging, WhatsApp and social media direct messaging. Proponents describe the approach as an upgrade to the  chatbots  that started popping up on retailer s websites around 2015. But the technology never quite matched the hype, with chatbots  automated conversations coming across as  clunky and impersonal.  Instead, brands that have been interacting with customers through chat say it provides a level of intimacy often missing from #digital commerce.

Tamara Mellon started texting with shoppers last year via #Apple Business Chat, a platform which allows brands to communicate with shoppers as though they were one of their contacts. When shoppers click  let s chat  on the company s site, they are dropped into a text message with one of five employees. Customers can send product requests via text message; they can also send photos of themselves and ask for shoes that match their outfits. Chat now makes up 11 percent of Tamara Mellon s sales, which total over $30 million. In June, the company raised $50 million.

Brands looking to conversational commerce are inventing ways to overcome one of the biggest challenges facing advertisers today: that a growing amount of consumers  activity online takes place in private chats with friends and family, rather than on marketing-saturated public feeds. Will the tactic pay off? [Link in bio]  : @tamaramellon
Ever chatted to a brand via text message? Several fashion companies like Tamara Mellon, Burberry and Reformation are jumping on board conversational
Like it or not, drops have taken fashion by storm. From its lesser-known roots in the backstreets of Tokyo s Ura-Harajuku district to overnight queues outside Supreme s London outpost, drop culture has become a way for luxury brands to turbocharge the perceived scarcity   and desirability   of their products to a millennial audience. The likes of Moncler, Louis Vuitton, Celine, Balenciaga, Fendi, Rimowa and Burberry have all dropped limited edition off-season collections and used their social media mouthpieces to fan the flames of hype. Dad sneakers, accessories in exclusive colourways and need-to-know artistic collaborations are just a few of the items that hypebeasts and luxury shoppers are setting their alarms for, lest they miss out.

For some players, the release model pays off   albeit not always immediately   and a well-executed drop can have longer-term benefits beyond a single purchase. But brands need to approach the drop model with caution as there s much more to it than producing smaller quantities of a product and posting an elusive Instagram post. Having an engaged social media following and reliable distribution channels are musts. Meanwhile, product categories requiring try-ons and deliberation, say denim or jewellery, might be trickier to sell via drops. For brands that do suit the drops model, swipe across to see how to get started and read the full story at businessoffashion.com [Link in bio]  : @pppiccioli for @moncler
Like it or not, drops have taken fashion by storm. From its lesser-known roots in the backstreets of Tokyo s Ura-Harajuku district to overnight queues
Are CEOs fashion s newest stars? LVMH s Bernard Arnault has billed himself as the biggest fan of the brands he owns, including Christian Dior, Celine and Givenchy. The sense of wonder he displays at major events   whether he is posing for the press with Dior brand ambassador Charlize Theron or snapping runway looks   is a performance in itself. One that everyone is watching more closely than ever.

As the second-richest person in the world, according to Bloomberg, Arnault receives an outsized amount of attention when compared to his fellow industry executives. But while he might be recognised as one of the first business leaders within #luxury to craft a public persona, he is no longer alone in drawing a spotlight once reserved for top #creativedirectors.

It wasn't always like this. In the famous designer-CEO partnerships of fashion's past   such as Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé, Marc Jacobs and Robert Duffy, Calvin Klein and Barry K Schwartz, or Valentino Garavani and Giancarlo Giammetti   business leaders often played a supporting, if not silent, role. But as #fashion has evolved over the past 30 years from a collection of small-to-medium-sized private businesses into a global industry dominated by publicly traded, multi-billion-dollar conglomerates, the executive profile has changed. So, whether they intended for it to happen or not, the #CEOs often become as famous as the designers who work for them   sometimes even more so. [Link in bio]  : @gettyimages
Are CEOs fashion s newest stars? LVMH s Bernard Arnault has billed himself as the biggest fan of the brands he owns, including Christian Dior, Celine
Why is  Queer Eye  so good at selling product? When Jonathan Van Ness, who is part of the show, recommended a green concealer stick to Tom Jackson, one of the  heroes,  Twitter was flooded with questions about which brand he used. After it was revealed that he applied Cover FX s  Correct Click  stick, it sold out within hours. But this is not an unusual story for the hit Netflix reboot of  Queer Eye for the Straight Guy,  which originally aired on Bravo in 2003.

Product placement is a fixture in both iterations, but the tactics have changed with the times. In the original, the cast would frequently drop brand names. While logos do appear on #QueerEye, brand dropping is rarer, and, as with Van Ness  concealer, viewers are often left to discover a product s name and manufacturer themselves.

Tan France, the show s fashion expert, has mentioned a brand by name only once   Target, in the first season.  A common misperception is that we get paid to take heroes to certain places,  he says.  I base it on what s there and appropriate for the hero. I m never like  I want them to look like a supermodel so I ll take them to Gucci.  That s not sustainable and a lifestyle they can maintain.  If France finds a store that works for the character, the producers will reach out and find ways of monetising it. Other times, the endorsements are completely organic   the green stick Van Ness recommended was a product he loved from his career as a hairstylist, and wasn t paid for by the brand.

After receiving criticism for inauthentic product placement during the first iteration, producers were careful. The reboot also has the luxury of streaming on #Netflix, which is free from the pressure to draw advertisers. Still, the #FabFive have become stars of their own, making endorsements on their Instagram accounts and monetising their social media presence. Read more at businessoffashion.com [Link in bio]  : @netflix
Why is Queer Eye so good at selling product? When Jonathan Van Ness, who is part of the show, recommended a green concealer stick to Tom Jackson, on
Short shorts are back. Today, brands and retailers are dreaming up new styles that end well above the knee. Women s hemlines fluctuate all the time, with miniskirts giving way to maxi dresses and coming roaring back in the last decade alone. Men s pants, suits and shorts evolve as well, but on a slower timetable. The last time short shorts were this popular, Magnum, P.I. was on TV and the compact disc player had just been unveiled.

Merchandisers attribute the return of short shorts to undercurrents bubbling up in #fashion and the culture at large, from the #retro and #athletic wear trends to the rise of casual dressing, changing gender norms and even climate change (short shorts pair well with the sweltering summers experienced in fashion capitals like Paris and London in recent years). Lastly, young men in the booming #health and #fitness economy simply want to flaunt the fruits of their labour.
 Quads feel like the new biceps in a lot of ways,  says Justin Berkowitz, the men s fashion director at Bloomingdale s.

There is no patient zero for the short shorts trend. Rick Owens, Thom Browne and a handful of other mostly avant-garde designers have incorporated shorts into their collections for years, and Chubbies, which started online in 2011, helped introduce college-aged men to the garment. But runway watchers cite the Spring Summer 2019 season as a watershed moment. That season, major brands, from Fendi and Balmain to Alyx and Off-White, sent more than 300 male models in short shorts down the runway, nearly triple the previous year s total, according to Tagwalk, a fashion search engine. Several menswear buyers cited Prada s collection, featuring models dressed in tailored khaki shorts with 4-inch or shorter inseams, paired with polos, blazers and leather jackets, as particularly influential. But, does this trend have legs? Read the full story at businessoffashion.com [Link in bio]
Short shorts are back. Today, brands and retailers are dreaming up new styles that end well above the knee. Women s hemlines fluctuate all the time, w

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