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The Business of Fashion on Instagram

An essential daily resource for fashion creatives, executives and entrepreneurs all over the world.

 Last week, two makeshift consortiums of designers and retailers signed open letters agitating for the realignment of the delivery and markdown calendar,  writes Eugene Rabkin in a new op-ed for BoF.  These moves have their roots in longstanding issues with the broken fashion cycle, and change is overdue. While it s clearly absurd for consumers to shop for cashmere turtlenecks in August or shorts in February, the early delivery schedule also puts unnecessary pressure on independent designers. By the time May and November come around, most of their clothes go on sale, eroding profitability and brand equity,  he says. 
 
But, for Rabkin, there is  an elephant in the room that nobody has yet addressed. One of the key reasons that markdowns happen so early in the season is pricing. In recent years, full-price designer fashion has become stratospherically expensive. Take a look at any luxury e-commerce site and you will see it peppered with 1,500 boots, 900 sweatshirts and 500 t-shirts,  he argues.  
 
Rabkin continues:  In this way, luxury fashion has become the perfect reflection of the growing economic stratification that has gripped Western society. There is the 1 percent who can afford such prices, and the 99 percent who shop on sale. What we are witnessing, when it comes to discounts, is a cat and mouse game between the fashion industry and its consumers, one in which everyone, understandably, acts in their own self-interest.  Read his full op-ed on businessoffashion.com [Link in bio]  : @shutterstock
Last week, two makeshift consortiums of designers and retailers signed open letters agitating for the realignment of the delivery and markdown calendar, writes Eugene Rabkin in a new op-ed for BoF. These moves have their roots in longstanding issues with the broken fashion cycle, and change is overdue. While it s clearly absurd for consumers to shop for cashmere turtlenecks in August or shorts in February, the early delivery schedule also puts unnecessary pressure on independent designers. By the time May and November come around, most of their clothes go on sale, eroding profitability and brand equity, he says. But, for Rabkin, there is an elephant in the room that nobody has yet addressed. One of the key reasons that markdowns happen so early in the season is pricing. In recent years, full-price designer fashion has become stratospherically expensive. Take a look at any luxury e-commerce site and you will see it peppered with 1,500 boots, 900 sweatshirts and 500 t-shirts, he argues. Rabkin continues: In this way, luxury fashion has become the perfect reflection of the growing economic stratification that has gripped Western society. There is the 1 percent who can afford such prices, and the 99 percent who shop on sale. What we are witnessing, when it comes to discounts, is a cat and mouse game between the fashion industry and its consumers, one in which everyone, understandably, acts in their own self-interest. Read his full op-ed on businessoffashion.com [Link in bio] : @shutterstock

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