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The Business of Fashion on Instagram

The Business of Fashion on Instagram

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For beauty journalists just starting out in the industry, becoming an editor at a high-profile magazine or website is a covetable career move.  But for aspiring editors of colour, it s a role that can come with strings attached,  argues style and beauty journalist Jamé Jackson, in a new op-ed today.  When we get those coveted jobs at major publications, they are often quickly revealed to be two roles packed into one: the usual job of sourcing stories and writing up what s new in the world of beauty, and an unspoken job of representing our race on mastheads that are still overwhelmingly white,  she says.

Jackson argues that black editors frequently find themselves in the role of  gatekeeping,  ensuring their white peers don t misuse or gloss over culturally sensitive terms and topics. And they are considered the staff experts on black beauty products, regardless of whether it s their primary area of interest. That role has only grown more complicated as the #beauty industry has taken steps toward improving its record on inclusivity in the face of growing consumer interest. More brands are putting a diverse range of models in their advertising campaigns, and rolling out products meant for customers with darker skin, from Rihanna s LVMH-backed Fenty Beauty to black-owned beauty brands such as Juvia s Place, Beauty Bakerie and Mented Cosmetics.

But beauty publications still often struggle to talk about #inclusivity in an authentic way, which is why, Jackson says, the task often falls to a handful of black staffers.  But the work of showing up for one s culture while still excelling in a mainstream, white-dominated environment, though rewarding, can also be draining for editors of colour. And that s on top of the wider everyday struggles of being black in fashion,  she says. So, what s the solution? Read the full op-ed on businessoffashion.com. [Link in bio]  : @gettyimages   : @theblondemisfit
For beauty journalists just starting out in the industry, becoming an editor at a high-profile magazine or website is a covetable career move. But for aspiring editors of colour, it s a role that can come with strings attached, argues style and beauty journalist Jamé Jackson, in a new op-ed today. When we get those coveted jobs at major publications, they are often quickly revealed to be two roles packed into one: the usual job of sourcing stories and writing up what s new in the world of beauty, and an unspoken job of representing our race on mastheads that are still overwhelmingly white, she says. Jackson argues that black editors frequently find themselves in the role of gatekeeping, ensuring their white peers don t misuse or gloss over culturally sensitive terms and topics. And they are considered the staff experts on black beauty products, regardless of whether it s their primary area of interest. That role has only grown more complicated as the #beauty industry has taken steps toward improving its record on inclusivity in the face of growing consumer interest. More brands are putting a diverse range of models in their advertising campaigns, and rolling out products meant for customers with darker skin, from Rihanna s LVMH-backed Fenty Beauty to black-owned beauty brands such as Juvia s Place, Beauty Bakerie and Mented Cosmetics. But beauty publications still often struggle to talk about #inclusivity in an authentic way, which is why, Jackson says, the task often falls to a handful of black staffers. But the work of showing up for one s culture while still excelling in a mainstream, white-dominated environment, though rewarding, can also be draining for editors of colour. And that s on top of the wider everyday struggles of being black in fashion, she says. So, what s the solution? Read the full op-ed on businessoffashion.com. [Link in bio] : @gettyimages : @theblondemisfit

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