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The Business of Fashion on Instagram

The Business of Fashion on Instagram

An essential daily resource for fashion creatives, executives and entrepreneurs all over the world.

From #fastfashion to #luxury, big brands want consumers to know they care about the environment. In the last week alone, Inditex SA   owner of Zara, the world s biggest fast fashion brand   launched a suite of new sustainability targets, including a commitment to only use recycled polyester and ensure all its cotton, linen and viscose are  produced more sustainably before 2025. Meanwhile, luxury conglomerate LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton has made an effort to bolster its climate credentials by taking on eco-conscious designer Stella McCartney as an advisor alongside a minority stake in her brand. 
 
Underpinning these moves, and a flurry of similar commitments and investments over the last year that also take into account the industry's treatment of workers, is a rising tide of consumer awareness and regulatory scrutiny on the fashion industry s environmental impact. The challenge for the fashion world is finding a way to operate sustainably and profitably in the long-term. Fundamentally more sustainable fashion, means less fashion. 
 
Nonetheless, brands are increasingly eager to champion their sustainability credentials in a bid to entice younger consumers who claim to care deeply about how and where their clothes were made   42 percent of millennials say they want to know what goes into products and how they are made before they buy, according to The Business of Fashion and McKinsey & Company s annual State of Fashion report. 
 
In the near-term, brands see big potential in conscious consumption, with a growing number of wholesalers carving out spaces in-store and online dedicated to more sustainable products. But longer-term, the trend raises a central tension for many brands: in an era of growing consciousness and concern about the strain mass consumption is placing on the planet and its resources, can brands be #sustainable and continue to grow at the same time? [Link in bio]  : @zara
From #fastfashion to #luxury, big brands want consumers to know they care about the environment. In the last week alone, Inditex SA owner of Zara, the world s biggest fast fashion brand launched a suite of new sustainability targets, including a commitment to only use recycled polyester and ensure all its cotton, linen and viscose are produced more sustainably before 2025. Meanwhile, luxury conglomerate LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton has made an effort to bolster its climate credentials by taking on eco-conscious designer Stella McCartney as an advisor alongside a minority stake in her brand. Underpinning these moves, and a flurry of similar commitments and investments over the last year that also take into account the industry's treatment of workers, is a rising tide of consumer awareness and regulatory scrutiny on the fashion industry s environmental impact. The challenge for the fashion world is finding a way to operate sustainably and profitably in the long-term. Fundamentally more sustainable fashion, means less fashion. Nonetheless, brands are increasingly eager to champion their sustainability credentials in a bid to entice younger consumers who claim to care deeply about how and where their clothes were made 42 percent of millennials say they want to know what goes into products and how they are made before they buy, according to The Business of Fashion and McKinsey & Company s annual State of Fashion report. In the near-term, brands see big potential in conscious consumption, with a growing number of wholesalers carving out spaces in-store and online dedicated to more sustainable products. But longer-term, the trend raises a central tension for many brands: in an era of growing consciousness and concern about the strain mass consumption is placing on the planet and its resources, can brands be #sustainable and continue to grow at the same time? [Link in bio] : @zara

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