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The Business of Fashion on Instagram

The Business of Fashion on Instagram

An essential daily resource for fashion creatives, executives and entrepreneurs all over the world.

Why is  Queer Eye  so good at selling product? When Jonathan Van Ness, who is part of the show, recommended a green concealer stick to Tom Jackson, one of the  heroes,  Twitter was flooded with questions about which brand he used. After it was revealed that he applied Cover FX s  Correct Click  stick, it sold out within hours. But this is not an unusual story for the hit Netflix reboot of  Queer Eye for the Straight Guy,  which originally aired on Bravo in 2003.

Product placement is a fixture in both iterations, but the tactics have changed with the times. In the original, the cast would frequently drop brand names. While logos do appear on #QueerEye, brand dropping is rarer, and, as with Van Ness  concealer, viewers are often left to discover a product s name and manufacturer themselves.

Tan France, the show s fashion expert, has mentioned a brand by name only once   Target, in the first season.  A common misperception is that we get paid to take heroes to certain places,  he says.  I base it on what s there and appropriate for the hero. I m never like  I want them to look like a supermodel so I ll take them to Gucci.  That s not sustainable and a lifestyle they can maintain.  If France finds a store that works for the character, the producers will reach out and find ways of monetising it. Other times, the endorsements are completely organic   the green stick Van Ness recommended was a product he loved from his career as a hairstylist, and wasn t paid for by the brand.

After receiving criticism for inauthentic product placement during the first iteration, producers were careful. The reboot also has the luxury of streaming on #Netflix, which is free from the pressure to draw advertisers. Still, the #FabFive have become stars of their own, making endorsements on their Instagram accounts and monetising their social media presence. Read more at businessoffashion.com [Link in bio]  : @netflix
Why is Queer Eye so good at selling product? When Jonathan Van Ness, who is part of the show, recommended a green concealer stick to Tom Jackson, one of the heroes, Twitter was flooded with questions about which brand he used. After it was revealed that he applied Cover FX s Correct Click stick, it sold out within hours. But this is not an unusual story for the hit Netflix reboot of Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, which originally aired on Bravo in 2003. Product placement is a fixture in both iterations, but the tactics have changed with the times. In the original, the cast would frequently drop brand names. While logos do appear on #QueerEye, brand dropping is rarer, and, as with Van Ness concealer, viewers are often left to discover a product s name and manufacturer themselves. Tan France, the show s fashion expert, has mentioned a brand by name only once Target, in the first season. A common misperception is that we get paid to take heroes to certain places, he says. I base it on what s there and appropriate for the hero. I m never like I want them to look like a supermodel so I ll take them to Gucci. That s not sustainable and a lifestyle they can maintain. If France finds a store that works for the character, the producers will reach out and find ways of monetising it. Other times, the endorsements are completely organic the green stick Van Ness recommended was a product he loved from his career as a hairstylist, and wasn t paid for by the brand. After receiving criticism for inauthentic product placement during the first iteration, producers were careful. The reboot also has the luxury of streaming on #Netflix, which is free from the pressure to draw advertisers. Still, the #FabFive have become stars of their own, making endorsements on their Instagram accounts and monetising their social media presence. Read more at businessoffashion.com [Link in bio] : @netflix

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