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The Business of Fashion on Instagram

The Business of Fashion on Instagram

An essential daily resource for fashion creatives, executives and entrepreneurs all over the world.

Have you heard about sneaker bots? Powered by technology, they complete shoe purchases within seconds of a drop going live. Case in point: the release of Adidas  highly anticipated Lundmark sneakers today. For users that weren t amongst the lucky winners of a raffle to shop the shoes, trying to snap up a pair from the remaining supply online can seem like an impossible task to achieve.

At House of Carts, a members-only chat group on the Discord platform, sneaker resellers therefore swapped tips and tricks to be the first to learn about the drop and to complete orders on Shopify s Yeezy Supply storefront as quickly as possible. But even lightning reflexes likely wouldn t have been enough to cop a pair of Lundmark Reflectives. However, House of Carts is also a hub for people looking to  cook  sneakers   the term for shoppers who deploy scripts or bots that automatically complete purchases within seconds of a drop going live.

Information about where to buy these programmes and how to set them up is easy to find online, with bots capable of snapping up coveted Yeezys in seconds are selling for as little as 200 plus monthly fees. And it can be worth the expense. Adidas set the Lundmark s price at 220, but it s expected to sell for around 1,000 on resale sites. A bot that manages to snag even one or two pairs will easily make back its cost.

Bots can cost anywhere from 200 to 1500 in addition to monthly maintenance fees, which can be as high as 500. With names like Cyber, SupBot, Dashe and Sole   and slick website designs to match   many of the most popular and expensive bots and automation applications sell out just as fast as the latest Off-White Nike collaboration.

What are the risks for users of bots and are brands doing anything to crack down on this parallel economy? Continue reading on businessoffashion.com [Link in bio]  : Paco Freire/SOPA Images/LightRocket via @gettyimages
Have you heard about sneaker bots? Powered by technology, they complete shoe purchases within seconds of a drop going live. Case in point: the release of Adidas highly anticipated Lundmark sneakers today. For users that weren t amongst the lucky winners of a raffle to shop the shoes, trying to snap up a pair from the remaining supply online can seem like an impossible task to achieve. At House of Carts, a members-only chat group on the Discord platform, sneaker resellers therefore swapped tips and tricks to be the first to learn about the drop and to complete orders on Shopify s Yeezy Supply storefront as quickly as possible. But even lightning reflexes likely wouldn t have been enough to cop a pair of Lundmark Reflectives. However, House of Carts is also a hub for people looking to cook sneakers the term for shoppers who deploy scripts or bots that automatically complete purchases within seconds of a drop going live. Information about where to buy these programmes and how to set them up is easy to find online, with bots capable of snapping up coveted Yeezys in seconds are selling for as little as 200 plus monthly fees. And it can be worth the expense. Adidas set the Lundmark s price at 220, but it s expected to sell for around 1,000 on resale sites. A bot that manages to snag even one or two pairs will easily make back its cost. Bots can cost anywhere from 200 to 1500 in addition to monthly maintenance fees, which can be as high as 500. With names like Cyber, SupBot, Dashe and Sole and slick website designs to match many of the most popular and expensive bots and automation applications sell out just as fast as the latest Off-White Nike collaboration. What are the risks for users of bots and are brands doing anything to crack down on this parallel economy? Continue reading on businessoffashion.com [Link in bio] : Paco Freire/SOPA Images/LightRocket via @gettyimages

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