Ever tried to capture a sky dressed in twinkling stars only to find them emerging as tiny specks of dust on your screen? Your camera has done absolutely no justice to the moment, but that doesn't necessarily mean you should set your camera aside. While using flash presents itself as the most immediate solution to low-light photography, not all situations stand to benefit from it. We turned to the experts at Sony to share a few tips on how to make the most of the situation. 

1. Bump up your camera's ISO

#TechThursday: Top tips on photographing in low-light conditions
ISO settings in your camera determine the sensors' sensitivity to light. If you want to capture more light, you need to increase the camera's ISO which enables the sensor to collect light more quickly. But here's the problem with most cameras: When you increase your ISO level, you introduce sensor noise which inflicts your photo with a gradient effect. If you frequently use your camera in low-light situations, consider investing one built specifically to handle high-ISO photography. This will allow you to capture snaps in subtle detail, ranging from shadows to highlights, with barely any noise.  

2. The tripod's your best friend

low light photography
Shooting in low light means you need to rely on a longer exposure so that your camera sensor can effectively capture every detail. Using a tripod will achieve image stability and help eliminate any camera shakes that risk ruining your photo. To avoid any possible shakes, enable the built-in self-timer in your digital camera to trigger the shutter.

3. Pick a fast lens

low light photography
The speed of a lens and how 'fast' it is refers to the maximum aperture of the lens. The larger the maximum aperture, the faster the lens. When these conditions are in place, your camera is rigged to capture very fast exposures in low-light settings without sacrificing sharpness and clarity.