It might be Prince Harry's virgin trip to Nepal, but his visit rides upon two hundred years of bilateral ties between Britain and this Himalayan country. A post-war treaty inked on March 1816 saw both nations working in tandem as two independent entities, where Nepal wasn't colonised as a subject, but instead looked upon as a partner — a rare arrangement at that time given the British Empire's proclivities to growing their colonies in Asia.

Underpinning all this history is the recruitment of Gurkha soldiers into the British army, whose contributions Prince Harry acknowledged in no small part during his official visit to the country. Besides meeting with gurkhas at the British Gurkha Camp, he put his creature comforts aside to stay in the village home of a former Gurkha soldier — where a barking dog kept him up for most of the night. 

Hands clasped together and held near the heart, Prince Harry greeted the Nepali people in a familiar gesture, who in turn showered him with scarves and floral garlands. A man of the people, he visited earthquake-stricken villages, ate with his hands, played volleyball with school children, and joined in the traditional festival of Holi.

As his royal five-day visit came to a close, he chose to extend his stay, this time going incognito to Lapubensi in the Gorkha district to help rebuild a quake-affected school. For a man who has the world at his feet, he certainly has them firmly planted on the ground and isn't afraid to let it cake in mud if it's for a good cause. Below, some highlights from his official trip to Nepal. 

Prince Harry in Nepal

Prince Harry in Nepal

Prince Harry in Nepal

Prince Harry in Nepal

Prince Harry in Nepal

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Source:http://www.buro247.sg/lifestyle/travel/traveltuesday-bhutan-uma-by-como-paro-royal-himala.html