The set: After seasons of showing at the David H. Hoch Theater at the Lincoln Center, she invited the fashion crowd to show up bright and early at the Whitney Museum and view the collection in the comfort of soft natural light.

The collection: "Feel I'm goin' back to Massachusetts," croons the Bee Gees in their 1968 hit song Massachusetts that opened Tory Burch's spring/summer show and set the next few minutes on a yearning for home, wherever that may be. For Burch, home is the East Coast and it has in many ways inspired her elegant preppy styles be it for hosting parties at home, or ruling the tennis courts. Expectedly, there were plenty of those pieces this time, chic green cardigans (look 1), nautical-themed jackets and pants (looks 12,13, 14, 15 & 16), and flouncy skirts (looks 8 & 10), but keeping things fresh were the bold orange smock dresses (looks 32 & 35) and kaftans (look 26 & 39) that added a surprising hippy twist to what started off as a preppy outing.

Something you might have missed: In keeping with the carefree spirit of the West Coast, models were given an all-natural Californian glow, right down to the freckles — drawn in of course — achieved with products from Jessica Alba's Honest Beauty make-up line.

The inspiration:
For spring 2017, Kate and Laura Mulleavy were inspired by two films: The 1973 Spanish movie, The Spirit of the Beehive and Janis: Little Girl Blue, the documentary on the legendary rock singer.

The collection: Like all their shows, this was nothing short of romantic fused with gothic, while lending an element of fantasy. Ethereal lace dresses cascading in ruffles (a hint at the Spanish film the collection referenced) were further elevated with metallic gold threadwork and intricate embroideries and embellishments. For fans of the Mulleavy sisters' rock 'n' roll grit, those Janis Joplin-inspired dresses (looks 24, 25, 26 & 27), fringed leather jackets paired with trousers held together with safety pins (looks 11 & 12) are what you'll want to lust over.

What you might have missed: Textiles heavily inspired by bees. Layers and layers of honeycomb tulle that echoed throughout the collection, and studded leather jackets (look 9, 10, 11, 12, 14 & 15) representing bee colonies. What looked like patterns to the eye were actually an intricate play on textures when studied up close.

The set: An empty space at Hudson River Park's Pier 76 was turned into something resembling a scene out of Breaking Bad — a desert with rusty abandoned cars stacked on top of one another taking centrestage.

The collection: At the centre of his collections, designer Stuart Vevers has always had fun shaking up typically American pieces of outerwear, be it the varsity, bomber, or shearling jacket. This time, motorcycle jackets (looks 2, 3, 4, & 12) get tougher than ever with plenty of studs, fur, and embroidered patches to signal the brand's fun, quirky take on Americana. This was his journey into exploring the idea of being part of a movement, whether a group of rebels or poets, and yet retaining a form of individuality. The heavy use of embellishment must be Vevers' call for his audience to make his pieces their own. Yet all this toughness was balanced out by the softness in sheer prairie dresses (looks 1, 3, 4, 5 & 8), subtly sexy and exuding youthful appeal. When it comes to reaching a younger demographic — which Coach is trying to do — T-shirts are always a good idea. Here, they're emblazoned with images of Elvis (looks 16, 17 & 18) and had such a street-easy cool, that it probably doesn't matter that their young fans may have no clue as to who he is.

Something you might have missed: Wonder what the words on some of the embellished jackets, such as "bobcat rebel", mean? They are references to famous motorcycle gangs. They send the ultimate 'don't mess with me' message.

Related story: The best street style from New York Fashion Week SS17

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See all shows from New York Fashion Week spring/summer 2017