AGI & SAM: RECKLESS ROCKERS
The collection: There was a certain recklessness in which Agi Mdumulla and Sam Cotton approached spring/summer 2017. For young designers like the London-based duo, tailoring traditions are usually dutifully referenced, only to be reworked and born again. The outerwear crystalised Agi & Sam's rakish air — checked robes cinched over trousers (looks 4 & 30) — followed by a smattering of windowpane checks (looks 1 & 17) nonchalantly puddled over footwear in some intances (look 5 & 27). Grandmother's floral curtains saw light by way of blousons and suiting (looks 2 & 11), interspersed with the odd punk rocker with flowers in their hair — a reference that played off the rockabilly creepers which grounded every look.

Something you might have missed:
The midi-sleeve charcoal grey double-breasted jacket layered over a longline gingham shirt with an oversized collar — the intended impetuousness reminiscent of raiding (and wrecking) dad's wardrobe (look 21). 

Buro loves:
The styling. Suit jackets on skin (look 11) with shirts left half unbuttoned (l00k 24). Hot. 

E. TAUTZ: THE ONLY WAY IS UP
Summer high: It's no surprise that Patrick Grant equates summer to shorts, but this season is by far the shortest he has gone. Forget thigh-skimming — this gives the almost bare-legged Topman Design runway show yesterday a run for its money. But unlike the sunburnt beach boys from the high street brand's creative line, Grant's boys were far more pasty, a tad more intellectual, with focus placed on the art of tailoring.

The collection:
Sitting snugly above the hips, shorts in all shapes streamed down the runway: Flat-front, pleated, drawstring, denim with contrast stitching... all paired in subdued elegance with stripes in all forms — classical, knitted and tie-dyed.

Wishlist worthy:
Those oversized blousons and Macs (looks 4, 5, 18). Handsome, practical, and to be paired with oversized circular frames à la the runway (look 6).

CASELY-HAYFORD: FUSION GALORE
The inspiration: Combining two very British music movements such as '70s rock and early 2000's grime, Charlie Casely-Hayford took these two distinct music genres and created a collection that explored each cultural styles. From the clashing prints of traditional Moroccan and Palestinian dress to the streamlined minimalism of British sportswear, it was all about precipitating a fusion of sorts.

The collection:
 Paisley printed silk suits in blue and pink were the standout pieces that reiterated their Moroccan influences (looks 20 & 22). Cloud and paintbrush splotches were seen on coats, suits and a pinstriped shirt (looks 5, 6 and 15). Suits and shirts were decorated with colourful embroidery attached either on sleeves or across the chest, and heavy neck chokers and necklaces served to recall the inspiration.

Womenswear: 
The design duo presented their first womenswear capsule collection, which will be available only through appointment in London with their new Personal Tailoring and Bespoke services. 

MATTHEW MILLER: DECONSTRUCTED PUNK
The inspiration: Skin-head culture. Palpable, but not too hardcore.

The collection:
Apart from the lightweight coats in dark hues and tonal checkerboards (look 16), Mattew Miller tried his hand at deconstruction: Flight jackets (look 15) and suit jackets (look 1) were re-designed and deconstructed. The designer spared no expense with the pin-on badges (looks 3, 9 & 21) and bleached denim was re-printed to achieve a cloud effect (look 10) — a reference to British romantic painter, John Constable.

Something you might have missed:
Suits were adorned with huge safety pins on the rear, with a piece of fabric attached, reading, 'Negasonic Teenage Warhead'. It could either be a reference to a character from Marvel's comics or, the 1995 song by heavy metal band Monster Magnet. Our money's on the latter. 

Related story:
The best street style from London Men's Fashion Week SS17

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