The collection: There was a certain recklessness in which Agi Mdumulla and Sam Cotton approached spring/summer 2017. For young designers like the London-based duo, tailoring traditions are usually dutifully referenced, only to be reworked and born again. The outerwear crystalised Agi & Sam's rakish air — checked robes cinched over trousers (looks 4 & 30) — followed by a smattering of windowpane checks (looks 1 & 17) nonchalantly puddled over footwear in some intances (look 5 & 27). Grandmother's floral curtains saw light by way of blousons and suiting (looks 2 & 11), interspersed with the odd punk rocker with flowers in their hair — a reference that played off the rockabilly creepers which grounded every look.

Something you might have missed:
The midi-sleeve charcoal grey double-breasted jacket layered over a longline gingham shirt with an oversized collar — the intended impetuousness reminiscent of raiding (and wrecking) dad's wardrobe (look 21). 

Buro loves:
The styling. Suit jackets on skin (look 11) with shirts left half unbuttoned (l00k 24). Hot. 

Summer high: It's no surprise that Patrick Grant equates summer to shorts, but this season is by far the shortest he has gone. Forget thigh-skimming — this gives the almost bare-legged Topman Design runway show yesterday a run for its money. But unlike the sunburnt beach boys from the high street brand's creative line, Grant's boys were far more pasty, a tad more intellectual, with focus placed on the art of tailoring.

The collection:
Sitting snugly above the hips, shorts in all shapes streamed down the runway: Flat-front, pleated, drawstring, denim with contrast stitching... all paired in subdued elegance with stripes in all forms — classical, knitted and tie-dyed.

Wishlist worthy:
Those oversized blousons and Macs (looks 4, 5, 18). Handsome, practical, and to be paired with oversized circular frames à la the runway (look 6).

The inspiration: Combining two very British music movements such as '70s rock and early 2000's grime, Charlie Casely-Hayford took these two distinct music genres and created a collection that explored each cultural styles. From the clashing prints of traditional Moroccan and Palestinian dress to the streamlined minimalism of British sportswear, it was all about precipitating a fusion of sorts.

The collection:
 Paisley printed silk suits in blue and pink were the standout pieces that reiterated their Moroccan influences (looks 20 & 22). Cloud and paintbrush splotches were seen on coats, suits and a pinstriped shirt (looks 5, 6 and 15). Suits and shirts were decorated with colourful embroidery attached either on sleeves or across the chest, and heavy neck chokers and necklaces served to recall the inspiration.

The design duo presented their first womenswear capsule collection, which will be available only through appointment in London with their new Personal Tailoring and Bespoke services. 

The inspiration: Skin-head culture. Palpable, but not too hardcore.

The collection:
Apart from the lightweight coats in dark hues and tonal checkerboards (look 16), Mattew Miller tried his hand at deconstruction: Flight jackets (look 15) and suit jackets (look 1) were re-designed and deconstructed. The designer spared no expense with the pin-on badges (looks 3, 9 & 21) and bleached denim was re-printed to achieve a cloud effect (look 10) — a reference to British romantic painter, John Constable.

Something you might have missed:
Suits were adorned with huge safety pins on the rear, with a piece of fabric attached, reading, 'Negasonic Teenage Warhead'. It could either be a reference to a character from Marvel's comics or, the 1995 song by heavy metal band Monster Magnet. Our money's on the latter. 

Related story:
The best street style from London Men's Fashion Week SS17

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See all the shows from London Collections Men SS17