Get to Heaven, Everything Everything 

After the infectious Cough Cough was played through the grounds of Camp Symmetry back in 2013, we latched onto the music of Everything Everything (repetition repetition, much?). We could call it indie-rock, but that might do their experimental sounds an injustice. After the critical success of their last album Arc, the quartet are back with visceral, off-the-cuff tracks. With unconventional song structures, and the bellowing vocals of lead singer Jonathan Higgs, their new record deserves a place on your shelf. 

Recreational Love, the bird and the bee 

Euphoric indie retro-pop may sound like a mouthful, but it's the most accurate way that The Bird And The Bee's music can be described. Musicians Inara George and Greg Kurstin are back with their first work of original material since 2009's Ray Guns Are Not Just the Future. A year later, they embarked on a Hall and Oates tribute album – that might give you a hint about their sound. Recreational Love seems to be just the sweet, mellow fix we need.

Out on 17 July

Currents, Tame Impala

It's no secret that the name 'Tame Impala' in itself is enough to get Currents on any album roundup this season, even before its release. "[The album] follows the progression of someone feeling like they are becoming something else," says musician and founder of the band Kevin Parker. We're guessing that it'll also ring true for Tame Impala musically, with Currents venturing into, in the words of Parker, "dorky, white disco funk" – a switch from their psychedelic rock fare

Out on 17 July

Blood, Lianne La Havas 

We featured Lianne La Havas' Unstoppable in our inaugural weekend playlist, and there's more where that came from. The title Blood might sound a tad gruesome, but according to La Havas, the album is named after her Greek and Jamaican familial bloodlines, rather than any penchant for gore. La Havas' brand of folk and soul is silky smooth, and we're in impatient wait for Blood to drop.

Out on 31 July

How Does It Feel, MS MR

'Tumblr' as an adjective gets thrown around a lot these days. The term brings to mind memes, minimalist grid patterns, and now MS MR. Their aesthetic is a fitting accompaniment to their haunting, indie pop sound; pastel hues accompanied gothic imagery in their debut album's visuals. How Does It Feel doesn't seem to stray too far from their roots, but still offers something decidedly new. On the powerful single Painted, scratchy electric guitars make their presence known amidst the duo's theatrical instrumentation. 

Out on 17 July