Candid mishaps, expletive-infused interviews, on-set pranks — this is not that article. While we love her boisterous candour, Lawrence's latest venture puts us in a reflective mood. Playing the self-made matriarch in a solemn Christmas blockbuster ironically titled Joy, we can't help but examine our crush-rationale with more discerning eyes.

The movie's intensely opinionated female protagonist is, after all, not so unlike her off-screen persona. Going past the Hollywood class-clown image, Lawrence's firm stand on pressing industry plagues is no joke:

On gender wage gap:
"I would be lying if I didn't say there was an element of wanting to be liked that influenced my decision to close the deal without a real fight. I didn't want to seem 'difficult' or 'spoiled.' At the time, that seemed like a fine idea, until I saw the payroll on the Internet and realized every man I was working with definitely didn't worry about being 'difficult' or 'spoiled.'"

On privacy violation:
"Just because I'm a public figure, just because I'm an actress, does not mean that I asked for this," she says. "It does not mean that it comes with the territory. It's my body, and it should be my choice, and the fact that it is not my choice is absolutely disgusting."

On body-shaming:
"We see this airbrushed perfect model... but you just have to look past it," she says. "We [need to] stop treating each other like that, stop calling each other fat and stop with these unrealistic expectations for women. It's disappointing that the media keeps it alive and fuels that fire." 

Her uncensored realness may not be everyone's cup of tea, but few can deny that Lawrence's servings on social issues are to be applauded. You go, girl.

Joy arrives in local cinemas on 25 December.
For last week's #WomanCrushWednesday, click here.