For a peek into the past...

Sanctuary (2015)

Shortlisted by Germany to be their submission for the Oscars for Best Foreign Language Film this year, Sanctuary tells the coming of age story of a boy growing up in the foster home of Freistatt, considered one of the roughest facilities in youth welfare in the late '60s. Shot on the original location, the film shows the harsh contrast between the sexual liberation of the outside public and the repressed lifestyle of the boys inside.


7 November, 4.30pm at The Projector. Tickets here.

B-Movie: Lust & Sound in West-Berlin 1979-1989 (2015)

Described as "a documentary and a declaration of love rolled into one", this rollercoaster ride of a film introduces you to '80s West Berlin right to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Put together with staged reenactments, archive clips and home movies, the film delves into the lives of the culturally rich 'scenesters' in the post-punk underground scene. With a soundtrack that includes snippets of David Bowie, Joy Division and Sex Pistols, it's a treat for any music fan.

B Movie

9 November, 9.40pm at The Projector. Tickets here.

For fans of mockumentaries...

Men Show Movies & Women Their Breasts (2014)

Cannes Film Festival is a place to celebrate a lot of things — film, fashion and the talents who transit through this glitter parade. For filmmaker Isabell Šuba, it was a chance to have a go at uncovering a harsh truth: That not a single film from a female director was shown in the official competition. While one of her short films was screening in Cannes, she employed actress Anne Haug to pose as herself. Uncovering issues surrounding sexual discrimination, the film's a candid look into the film industry — shot within the span of just five days.

Men Show Movies woman the breasts

10 November, 7.30pm at The Projector. Tickets here.

For familiar faces...

Every Thing Will Be Fine (2015)

Starring James Franco, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Rachel McAdams, this drama deals with the aftermath of a car accident involving a troubled writer (Franco) and a young boy. Spanning 12 years of his life and the individuals surrounding him — his partner and the boy's family — it's directed by Wim Wenders, one of the greats of the New German Cinema movement. This dramatic effort is a stab in the dark for Wenders, who's better known for his documentaries and essay films such as the Oscar nominated The Salt of the Earth.

14 November, 8pm and 15 November, 8.30pm at The National Museum. Tickets here.