1. Leave Your Mark: Land Your Dream Job. Kill It in Your Career. Rock Social Media.
by Aliza Licht 

Aliza Light

Why read this: If you're in fashion or public relations (PR), this is the book for you. Aliza Licht's a former editor of Marie Claire before switching over to the other side: As the "PR girl" of DKNY for over 17 years. There are lots to learn from her: She built DKNY's Twitter community from the ground up from its early social media days in 2009, and Time's called her one of the "Six Women Who Rule the Fashion World". She was also one of the speakers at the inaugural TEDx Times Square, talking about the power of being real. Can we just say... "first things first, she's the realest"?

That's what she said:
"We're asked to make decisions that will affect us forever so early in life, and we often feel pressure to stick with the decisions we've made. But let's face it, it's not easy to find a career path. That's why the selfie is important. Self-examination is key. If you're happy with your answers, great. But if you're not, you owe it to yourself to do something about it."

2. Cravings: Recipes for All the Food You Want to Eat
by Chrissy Teigen 

Chrissy Teigen Cravings

Why read this: What's self-empowerment if you don't get to eat what you really want to? Even though #eatingclean's all the rage, there are some Mondays where you want to tell your nearest Salad Stop to just stick it. But this doesn't mean you cave in. Smart women — nay, confident, smart women like model Chrissy Teigen — find their way around it. Along the way, you'll also get to learn how to make John Legend's famous fried chicken with spicy honey butter, as well as Teigen's mother's Thai classics. It's a win-win.

That's what she said:
If you're expecting a model to write a cookbook full of diet recipes for you to perfect your bikini bod, I think you'll be a little surprised here. These are recipes we love to indulge in with family and friends. Some more hearty than others, some even more hearty than the hearty ones. Look, I don't want to be one of those dead-inside laughing-with-a-salad chicks, and I don't want to seem like one of those annoying "I can eat anything I want anytime" chicks. I just have to find ways to make those cravings work with my day job."

3. Bossypants
by Tina Fey

Tina Fey

Why read this: Who doesn't love a rags-to-riches story? While comedian and actor Tina Fey didn't exactly spend her childhood sweeping the chimney, she has spent a fair amount of her adolescent and early adulthood years cutting her teeth in the comedy circuit. From growing up in Pennsylvania and her days doing amateur improv in Chicago to her early sketches on Saturday Night Live, the Sisters star and 30 Rock creator dispels good advice on being a good boss, as well as a social critique on how to make it in a male-dominated industry. 

That's what she said: "
Ever since I became an executive producer of 30 Rock, people have asked me, "Is it hard for you, being the boss?" and "Is it uncomfortable for you to be the person in charge?" You know, in the same way they say, "Gosh, Mr. Trump, is it awkward for you to be the boss of all these people?" I can't answer for Mr. Trump, but in my case it is not. I've learned a lot over the past ten years about what it means to be the boss of people. In most cases being a good boss means hiring talented people and then getting out of their way."

4. You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life
by Jen Sincero 

You Are A Badass

Why read this: It's always nice to meet someone who tells it like it is. Self-help coach Jen Sincero is exactly that — she won't make you feel self-conscious at all about the fact that you're reading a self-help book. She's no-nonsense, quick-witted, and doesn't want you lying on your a** — even if that's the position you're taking to read her book. While she can be a little crass, it's a refreshing alternative to touchy-feely tomes.

That's what she said: 
"All this is to say that it's not your fault that you're f**ked up. It's your fault if you stay f**ked up, but the foundation of your f**kedupedness is something that's been passed down through generations of your family, like a coat of arms or a killer cornbread recipe, or in my case, equating confrontation with heart failure."

5. D.V.
by Diana Vreeland

Diana Vreeland

Why read this: Here's the woman who preceded Anna Wintour. I mean, preach — former fashion editor of Harper's Bazaar and editor-in-chief of Vogue Diana Vreeland's all sass and substance, dropping truth bombs such as "a little bit of bad taste is needed sometimes, it's no taste that's truly revolting." One of the 20th century's greatest fashion icons, her life and career was the subject of the 2011 documentary, The Eye Has to Travel, and she remains a constant inspiration for industry bigwigs and newbies alike. 

That's what she said:
"Nobody else would ever use such a hideous-looking thing in their swell offices — but it supports me at the base of my back, and that's what's important. Then, I have a little rubber cushion which gets me right at the end of my spine and keeps me straight up, up, up. Everyone who comes into my office at the Metropolitan thinks the cushion looks a bit medical but for me, it means that I sit straight and high, and it's marvelous."

To meet and celebrate other #GirlBosses here, join The Super Women Congress tonight at 7.30pm to mingle with four influential women as they share on how to juggle business with everything else. The panel includes Grace Clapham and Solonia Teodros of The Change School; Michaela Anchan, founder of Woolf Works, a women-only co-working space; Trixie Khong, founder of By Invite Only; Renee Lodens, founder of Travelshopa and Maria Kuvshinova, co-founder of private dining platform Clubvivre. Tickets here.